Germany

Germany can be a difficult place to travel through. Unlike France or Italy, not every place to visit is worth your time. Devastated by WWII, there was not a single German city that was spared, and most do not have any old-town other than a couple of reconstructed buildings. However, Germany was not a centralized state until the 20th century, and rich history of regional powers makes Germany’s many towns and villages the high point of any trip.

Tricks for Traveling in Germany

Tricks for Traveling in Germany

Travel across Europe and you will learn many different tricks for navigating each country. From my experience in Germany, I can say that it’s fairly easy and stress-free. However, there are still some things that might surprise you. Here are some points for optimizing your travel in Germany and making the best use of your time.
What should I see in Germany?

What should I see in Germany?

If you have never been to Germany before and would like to spend some time exploring the country, check this guide. I try to balance well-known destinations such as Neuschwanstein Castle with spectacular destinations off the beaten path such as Stralsund or Bamberg.
Baltic

Baltic

The Baltic region is best known for the Hanseatic League, a powerful trade league of cities and city-states that dominated the political environment of Northern Europe through to the end of the Middle Ages. Their influence can be felt across Northern Europe, but today it is most visible in the brick cityscapes of Lübeck, Wismar, and Stralsund. As the League declined, it was supplanted by new powers, the Dukes of Mecklenburg and Pomerania.
Bavaria

Bavaria

The Bavaria we see today is a multi-tribal state, binding the Bavarians together with the Swabians and Franks. The Bavarians’ lands are some of the most beautiful in Europe, having been spared centuries of European conflict.
Brandenburg

Brandenburg

Brandenburg formed the core of the modern German state. Around the royal and later Imperial capital of Berlin, the state grew from an impoverished medieval colony to form a European great power. The region is formed from three medieval marches, which represent the progress of German colonization over the 12-14th centuries. Beyond Berlin, the region is known for its cultural landscapes of beautiful riverside towns and inspiring palace and garden complexes.
Franconia

Franconia

Franconia is, in essence, an alternate spelling of France, as both refer to the same Germanic tribe. The Franks settled along the Main, bordered by the Bavarians to the South and the Saxons to the North. The spectacular achievements of the Franks can be seen in the great monuments of Würzburg, Nürnberg, and Bamberg and the countless towns, castles, and monasteries to their name.
Hessen-Nassau

Hessen-Nassau

The quiet forests and fields of the Hessen and Nassau families mask the dynamic nature of the lands they ruled over. Both the deep-rooted Catholic traditions of the Fuldaer Land and the dynamic Urban landscapes of the Wetterau contrast deeply with the rest of the pastoral and protestant landscapes. This is a land of sleepy towns of half-timbered houses and ancient castles.
Rhine-Maas

Rhine-Maas

In a forested vale between the Maas and Rhine Rivers and among crumbling ruins of a Roman bath town, Charlemagne founded the capital of his new Empire, Aachen. Around it emerged cities built on trade and the arts. Cologne, Maastricht, Liege, and others formed a brilliant cultural light for the new Kingdom. As the Empire aged and faded into irrelevance, so did the Rhine-Maas region, a victim of shifting trade routes and wartime devastation.
Saxony

Saxony

In the beginning, Saxony ruled the Empire, as the Ottonian dynasty made it her capital region. Saxony today is a diverse land focused on the families that emerged from the collapse of the Saxon tribal duchy in the early Middle Ages. In the north, the remnants of the Welf fought over their Ottonian legacy. In the East, the Saxons started their colonization of Slavic lands. In the South, the Wettin dynasty squabbled over inheritance but eventually built a nation that could challenge the Emperor.
Swabia

Swabia

Swabia is an ancient land, home to the greatest Emperors of the Holy Roman Empire and modern Germany’s most unintelligible dialect. Fractured into parts during the Middle Ages, the region is known for its many Imperial Cities, resplendent churches, and inspiring palaces. Of the regions in modern-day Germany, Swabia offers one of the richest travel experiences, from its world-class heritage sites to its strong cultural identity.
Upper-Rhine

Upper-Rhine

For travelers today, the Rhine valley allows us to experience the imperial majesty of a forgotten Empire. Soaring cathedrals, sweeping vineyards, and secluded mountain fortresses dot an ancient landscape. Though scarred by the tragedy of war, there is still much to see and experience in this region today.
Westphalia

Westphalia

Westphalia was the original home of the Saxon people and one of three great divisions of the Saxon kingdom, the others being Engern and Eastphalia. This is a flat land dominated broken only by a low range of hills separating the Ems basis from the Weser. Here you find large and ancient cities rising from the plains sprinkled with timeless villages and moated castles.

Return to the Modern Countries of Europe

Central Europe

Explore Europe from the perspective of ages past, when borders were different and when regional identities were stronger.